Vendor
Wiley
Published by
Wiley (2020-11-23)
Current material
Paperback / softback
Original language
English
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Botany & plant sciences
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Principles of Plant Genetics and Breeding

by George Acquaah

THE REVISED EDITION OF THE BESTSELLING TEXTBOOK, COVERING BOTH CLASSICAL AND MOLECULAR PLANT BREEDING

Principles of Plant Genetics and Breeding, Third Edition integrates theory and practice to provide an insightful examination of the fundamental principles and advanced techniques of modern plant breeding. Combining both classical and molecular tools, this comprehensive textbook describes the multidisciplinary strategies used to produce new varieties of crops and plants, particularly in response to the increasing demands to of growing populations. Illustrated chapters cover a wide range of topics, including plant reproductive systems, germplasm for breeding, molecular breeding, the common objectives of plant breeders, marketing and societal issues, and more.

Now in its third edition, this essential textbook contains extensively revised content that reflects recent advances and current practices. Substantial updates have been made to its molecular genetics and breeding sections, including discussions of new breeding techniques such as zinc finger nuclease, oligonucleotide directed mutagenesis, RNA-dependent DNA methylation, reverse breeding, genome editing, and others. A new table enables efficient comparison of an expanded list of molecular markers, including Allozyme, RFLPs, RAPD, SSR, ISSR, DAMD, AFLP, SNPs and ESTs. Also, new and updated "Industry Highlights" sections provide examples of the practical application of plant breeding methods to real-world problems. This new edition:

  • Organizes topics to reflect the stages of an actual breeding project
  • Incorporates the most recent technologies in the field, such as CRSPR genome edition and grafting on GM stock
  • Includes numerous illustrations and end-of-chapter self-assessment questions, key references, suggested readings, and links to relevant websites
  • Features a companion website containing additional artwork and instructor resources

Principles of Plant Genetics and Breeding offers researchers and professionals an invaluable resource and remains the ideal textbook for advanced undergraduates and graduates in plant science, particularly those studying plant breeding, biotechnology, and genetics.

 

GEORGE ACQUAAH is the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Bowie State University, Bowie, MD, USA. He is the author of four critically acclaimed textbooks on horticulture, crop production, biotechnology, and plant breeding. He is recipient of the prestigious USDA Award for Excellence in College and University Teaching in Food and Agricultural Sciences, and the Millennium Award for Excellence in Teaching, presented by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the US.

 

DEDICATION

PREFACE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

INDUSTRY HIGHLIGHTS BOXES

INDUSTRY HIGHLIGHTS BOXES: AUTHORS

SECTION 1: OVERVIEW AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

1.1               What is plant breeding?

1.2               The goals of plant breeding

1.3               The concept of genetic manipulations of plant attributes

1.4               Why breed plants?

1.5               Overview of the basic steps in plant breeding

1.6               How have plant breeding objectives changed over the years

1.7               The art and science of plant breeding

1.8               Training of plant breeders

1.9               The plant breeding industry

1.10           Duration and cost of plant breeding programs

1.11           The future of plant breeding in society

1.12           The organization of the book

CHAPTER 2 HISTORY OF PLANT BREEDING

2.1  Origins of agriculture and plant breeding

2.2 The “Unknown Breeder”

2.3  Plant manipulation efforts by early civilizations

2.4 Early pioneers of the theories and practices of modern plant breeding

2.5  Later pioneers and trailblazers

2.6 History of plant breeding technologies/techniques

2.7 Genome-wide approaches to crop improvement

2.8 Bioinformatics and OMICs technologies in crop improvement

2.9 Summary of changes in plant breeding over the last half century

2.10 Achievement of modern plant breeders

SECTION 2 POULATION AND QUANTITAVTIVE GENETIC PRINCIPLES  

CHAPTER 3 INTRODUCTION TO CONCEPTS OF POPULATION GENETICS

3.1 Concepts of a population and gene pool

3.2 Issues arising from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium

3.3 Factors affecting changes in gene frequency

3.4 Frequency dependent selection

3.5 Summary of key plant breeding applications

3.6 Modes of selection

3.7 Effect of mating system on selection

3.8 The concept of inbreeding

3.9 Inbreeding and its implications in plant breeding

3.10 Concept of population improvement

3.11 Types of open pollenated populations

CHAPTER 4 INTRODUCTION TO QUANTITATIVE GENETICS

4.1 What is quantitative genetics?

4.2 What is a quantitative trait?

4.3 Qualitative genetics versus quantitative genetics

4.4 The environment and quantitative variation

4.5 Polygenes and polygenic inheritance

4.6 Decision-making in breeding based on biometrical genetics

4.7 Gene action

4.8 Gene action and plant breeding

4.9 Variance components of a quantitative trait

4.10 The concept of heritability

4.11 Response to selection in breeding

4.12 Concept of correlated response

4.13 Selection for multiple traits

4.14 Concept of intuitive index

4.15 The concept of general worth

4.16 Nature of breeding characteristics and their levels of expression

4.17 Early generation testing

4.18 Concept of combining ability

4.19 Mating designs

4.20 The genetic architecture of quantitative traits

4.21 The effect of QTL on phenotype

4.22 Molecular basis of quantitative variation

4.23 Systems genetics

4.24 Predicting breeding value

4.25 Genomic selection (genome wide selection)

4.26 Mapping quantitative traits

SECTION 3 REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEMS

CHAPTER 5 INTRODUCTION TO REPRODUCTION

5.1 Importance of mode of reproduction to plant breeding

5.2 Overview of reproductive options in plants

5.3 Types of reproduction

5.4 Sexual reproduction

5.5         What is autogamy?

5.6        Self incompatibility

5.7 Male sterility

5.8  Dichogamy

5.9 Genetic and breeding implications of autogamy

5.10           Genotype conversion programs

5.11           What is allogamy?

5.12           Artificial pollination control techniques

5.13           Inbreeding depression

5.14           Mendelian concepts relating to the reproductive system

5.15           Complex inheritance

CHAPTER 6 HYBRIDIZATION

6.1 Concept of gene transfer and hybridization

6.2 Application of crossing in plant breeding

6.3 Artificial hybridization

6.4 Artificial pollination control techniques

6.5 Flower and flowering issues in hybridization

6.6 Emasculation

6.7 Pollination

6.8 Number of F1 crosses to make

6.9 Genetic issues in hybridization

6.10 Types of populations generated through hybridization

611 Wide crosses

6.12 Issue of reproductive isolation barriers

6.13 Overcoming challenges of reproductive barriers

6.14 Bridge crosses

CHAPTER 7  CLONAL PROPAGATION AND IN VITRO CULTURE

7.1 What is a clone?

7.2 Clones, inbred lines, and pure lines

7.3 Categories of clonally propagated species based on economic use

7.4 Categories of clonally propagated species for breeding purposes

7.5  Types of clonal propagation

7.6 Importance of clonal propagation in plant breeding

7.7 Breeding implications of clonal propagation

7.8 Genetic issues in clonal breeding

7.9 Breeding approaches used in clonal species

7.10 Natural propagation

7.11 In vitro culture

7.12 Micropropagation

7.13 Concept of totipotency

7.14 Somaclonal variation

7.15 Apomixis

7.16 Other tissue culture applications

7.17 Production of haploids

7.18  Doubled haploids

7.19 Germplasm preservation

SECTION 4 GERMPLASM FOR BREEDING

CHAPTER 8 VARIATION: TYPES, ORIGIN AND SCALE

8.1 Classifying plants

8.2 Rules of classification of plants

8.3 Operational classification systems

8.4 Types of variation among plants

8.5. Origins of genetic variability

8.6 Biotechnology for creating genetic variability

8.7 Scale of variability

CHAPTER 9 PLANT DOMESTICATION

9.1 The concept of evolution

9.2 What is domestication

9.3 Evolution versus domestication

9.4 Conscious selection versus unconscious selection

9.5 Patterns of plant domestication

9.6 Centers of plant domestication

9.7 Roll call of domesticated plants

9.8 Changes accompanying domestication

9.9 Genetic bottleneck

9.10 Tempo of domestication

9.11 Genetic architecture and domestication

9.12 Models of domestication

9.13 Modern breeding is a continuation of the domestication process

CHAPTER 10 PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES

10.1 Importance of germplasm to plant breeding

10.2 Centers of diversity in plant breeding

10.3 Sources of germplasm for plant breeding

10.4  Concept of genetic vulnerability

10.5 What plant breeders can do to address crop vulnerability

10.6 Wild (exotic) germplasm in plant breeding

10.7 Plant genetic resources conservation

10.8 Nature of cultivated plant genetic resources

10.9 Approaches to germplasm conservation

10.10 Germplasm collection

10.11 Types of plant germplasm collection

10.12 Managing plant genetic resources

10.13 Issue of redundancy and the concept of core subsets

10.14 Germplasm storage technologies

10.15 Using genetic resources

10.16 Plant exploration and introduction and their impact on agriculture

10.17 international conservation efforts

10.18 An example of a national germplasm conservation system

10.19 Who owns biodiversity?

10.20 Understanding the genetic architecture of germplasm for crop improvement

SECTION 5 BREEDING OBJECTIVES

CHAPTER 11 YIELD AND MORPHOLOGICA TRAITS

11.1 Physiological traits

11.2 What is yield?

11.3 Biological versus economic yield

11.4 The ideotype concept

11.5 Improving the efficiency of dry matter partitioning

11.6 Harvest index as a selection criterion for yield

11.7 Selecting for yield per se

11.8  Biological pathway to economic yield

11.9 The concept of yield potential

11.10 The concept of yield plateau

11.11 Yield stability

11.12 Lodging resistance

11.13 Shattering resistance

11.14 Reduced plant height

11.15 Breeding determinancy

11.16 Photoperiod response

11.17 Early maturity

CHAPTER 12 QUALITY TRAITS

12.1 Concept of quality

12.2 Nutritional quality of food crops

12.3 Brief history of breeding for improved nutritional quality of crops

12.4 Breeding for improved protein content

12.5 Improving protein content by genetic engineering

12.6 Breeding improved oil quality

12.7 Breeding low phytate cultivar

12.8 Breeding end use quality

12.9 Breeding seedlessness

12.10 Breeding for industrial uses

12.11 Breeding plants for novel traits

12.12 Breeding for enhanced bioavailability

CHAPTER 13 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS FACTORS

13.1 Environmental stress factors in crop production

13.2 Climate change and plant breeding

13.3 Crop production environment and stress

13.4  Abiotic environment stress factors

13.5 Biotic environmental stress factors

13.6 Effects of combined stresses

13.7 Impact of environmental stress factors in crop production

CHAPTER 14 BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO DISEASES AND INSECT PESTS

14.1 Selected definitions

14.2 Groups of pathogens and pests targeted by plant breeders

14.3 Biological and economic effects of plant pathogens

14.4 Overview of the methods for control of plant pathogens and pests

14.5 Concepts of resistance in breeding

14.6 Concepts of pathogen and host

14.7 Mechanisms of defense in plant against pathogens and pests

14.8 Types of genetic host resistance and their breeding approaches

14.9 Resistance breeding strategies

14.10 Challenges of breeding for pest resistance

14.11 Role of wild germplasm in disease and pest resistance breeding

14.12 Screening techniques in disease and pest resistance breeding

14.13 Applications of biotechnology in pest resistance breeding

14.14 Epidemics and plant breeding

CHAPTER 15 BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO ABIOTIC STRESSES

15.1 Importance of breeding for resistance to abiotic stresses

15.2 Resistance to abiotic stress and yield potential

15.3 Types of abiotic environmental stresses

15.4 Tolerance to stress or resistance to stress?

15.5 Screening for stress resistance

15.6 Drought stress

15.7 Breeding drought resistance

15.8 Approaches for breeding drought resistance

15.9 Cold stress

15.10 Mechanisms of resistance to low temperature

15.11 Selection for low-temperature tolerance

15.12 Breeding for tolerance to low-temperature stress

15.13 Salinity stress

15.14 Heat stress

15.15 Mineral toxicity stress

15.16 Mineral deficiency stress

15.17 Oxidative stress

15.18 Flood stress (water logging)

SECTION 6 SELECTION METHODS

CHAPTER 16 BREEDING SELF-POLINATED SPECIES

16.1  Types of cultivars

16.2 Genetic structure of cultivars and its implications in breeding

16.3 Types of self-pollinated cultivars

16.4 Common plant breeding notations

16.5 Mass selection

16.6 Pure-line selection

16.7 Pedigree selection

16.8 Bulk population breeding

16.9 Single seed descent

16.10 Backcross breeding

16.11 Special backcross procedures

16.12 Multiline breeding and cultivar blends

16.13 Composites

16.14 Recurrent selection

CHAPTER 17 BREEDING CROSS-POLLINATED SPECIES

17.1 The concept of population improvement

17.2 Concept of recurrent selection

17.3 Genetic basis of recurrent selection

17.4 Types of recurrent selection

17.5 Intrapopulation improvement methods

17.6 Optimizing gain from selection in population improvement

17.7  Development of synthetic cultivars

17.8 Backcross breeding

CHAPTER 18 BREEDING HYBRID CULTIVARS

18.1 What is a hybrid cultivar?

18.2 Brief historical perspective

18.3 The concept of hybrid vigor and inbreeding depression

18.4 Genetic basis of heterosis

18.5 Biometrics of heterosis

18.6 Concept of heterotic relationship

18.7 Types of hybrids

18.8 Germplasm procurement and development for hybrid production

18.9 Selection of parents (inbred lines)

18.10 Field establishment

18.11 Maintenance

18.12 Harvesting and processing

18.13 Hybrid seed production of maize

18.14 Hybrids in horticulture

18.15 Exploiting hybrid vigor in asexually reproducing species

18.16 Prerequisites for successful commercial hybrid seed production

CHAPTER  19 BREEDING CLONALLY PROPAGATED SPECIES

19.1 Clones, inbred lines and pure lines

19.2 Categories of clonally propagated species for breeding purposes

19.3 Breeding implications of clonal propagation

19.4 Genetic issues in clonal breeding

19.5 Breeding approaches used in clonal crops

19.6 Advantages and limitations of clonal propagation

19.7 Breeding apomictic cultivars

19.8 In vitro selection

SECTION 7  TECHNOLOGIES FOR LINKING GENES TO TRAITS

CHAPTER 20 MOLECULAR MARKERS

20.1 The concept of genetic markers

20.2 Use of genetic markers in plant breeding

20.3 Concept of polymorphism and the origin of molecular markers

20.4 Brief history of molecular markers

20.5 Classification of molecular markers

20.6 Enzyme-based markers

20.7 Hybridization-based markers

20.8 PCR-based markers

20.9 PCR based markers from RFLPs

20.10 DNA sequence-based markers

20.11 Comparison of selected molecular markers

20.12 Desirable properties of a molecular marker system

20.13 Readying markers for marker assisted selection

CHAPTER 21 MAPPING OF GENES

21.1 Why map genes?

21.2 Types of gene maps

21.3 Principles of linkage mapping

21.4 Mapping populations

21.5 Modifications of polymorphic markers

21.6 Linkage analysis of markers

21.7 Rendering linkage maps

21.8 Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs)

21.9 High-resolution QTL mapping

21.10 Bulk segregant analysis

21.11 The value of multiple populations in mapping

21.12 Comparative genome mapping

21.13 Synteny

21.14 Genome wide association studies

CHAPTER 22 GENE SEQUENCING and  OMICs TECHNOLOGIES

22.1 What is gene sequencing

22.2 Types of sequencing technologies

22.3 Next generation sequencing (NGS) workflow

22.4 Genotyping-by-sequencing

22.5 What are the OMICs technologies?

22.6 Genomics

22.7 Transcriptomics

22.8 Proteomics

22.9 Metabolomics

22.10 Phenomics

SECTION 8 APPLICATIONS OF GENETIC MARKERS IN BREEDING

CHAPTER 23 MARKER ASSISTED SELECTION

23.1 The concept of molecular breeding

23.2 Choosing molecular markers for MAS

23.3 Advantages of MAS over conventional breeding protocols

23.4 MAS schemes

23.5 Marker assisted backcross breeding

23.6 Marker assisted recurrent selection

23.7 Backcross breeding for introgression of wild genes

23.8 Marker assisted “forward selection”

23.9 Marker assisted gene pyramiding

23.10 Marker assisted early generation selection

23.11 Limitations of MAS

23.12 Enhancing the potential of MAS in breeding

CHAPTER 24 GENOMIC SELECTION AND GENOME WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDIES

24.1 Making the case for genomic selection

24.2 What is genomic or genome wide selection?

24.3 Overview of genomic selection procedure

24.4 Designing a training population

24.5 Markers of genomic selection

24.6 Statistical models for genomic selection

24.7 Applications of genomic selection

24.8 Genome wide association studies

24.9 MAS, MABC and GS compared

24.10   Haplotype

24.11 Linkage disequilibrium and haplotypes

24.12 Linkage disequilibrium mapping (Association mapping)

24.13 Breeding applications of association mapping

SECTION 9 MUTATIONS AND PLOIDY IN PLANT BREEDING

CHAPTER 25 MUTAGENESIS IN PLANT BREEDING

25.1 Brief historical perspective

25.2 Types of mutations

25.3 Mutagenic agents

25.4 Types of tissues used for mutagenesis

25.5 Factors affecting the success of mutagenesis

25.6 Mutation breeding of seed-bearing plants

25.7 Mutation breeding of clonally propagated species

25.8 Mutations from tissue culture systems

25.9 Using induced mutants

25.10  Limitations of mutagenesis as a plant breeding technique

25.12 Molecular techniques for enhancing efficiency of induced mutagenesis

25.13 Reverse genetics

25.14 Horticultural applications of mutagenesis

25.15 General effects of mutagenesis

25.16 Key successes of induced mutagenesis

CHAPTER 26 POLYPLOIDY IN PLANT BREEDING

26.1 Terminology

26.2 Variation in chromosome number

26.3 General effects of polyploidy in plants

26.4 Origin of polyploids

26.5 Autoploidy

26.6 Breeding autoploids

26.7 Natural alloploids

26.8 Anueploidydd

26.9 General importance of polyploidy in plant improvement

26.10 Inducing polyploids

26.11 Use of 2n gametes for introgression breeding

26.12 Haploidy

26.13 Anther culture

26.14 Doubled haploids

SECTION 10 MOLECULAR GENETIC MODIFICATION IN PLANT BREEDING

CHAPTER 30 BREEDING GENETICALLY MODIFIED PLANTS

27.1 What is biotechnology?

27.2 Antisense technology

27.3 Restriction enzymes

27.4 Vectors

27.5 Categories of vectors by function

27.6 Cloning

27.7 Breeding genetically modified (GM) cultivars

27.8 Engineering pest resistance

27.9  Trends in adoption of GM cultivars

CHAPTER 28 GENOME EDITING TECHNOLOGIES

28.1 General steps in genome editing

28.2 Types of editing systems

28.3 Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs)

28.4 Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)

28.5 Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas9)

28.6 Comparison of gene editing systems

28.7 RNA interference (RNAi)

28.8 Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis

CHAPTER 29 PARADIGM SHIFT IN PLANT BREEDING and OTHER NEW BREEDING TECHNOLOGIES

29.1 The way plant breeders manipulate the plant genome

29.2 Paradigm shifts in plant breeding

29.3 Cisgenesis

29.4 Intragenesis

29.5 Reverse breeding

29.6 Grafting non-GM scion on GM-rootstock

29.7 Agroinfiltration

29.8 Epigenetics

29.9 RNA-directed DNA methylation

29.10 DNA barcoding

SECTION 11 COMPUTER-AIDED APPLICATIONS IN PLANT BREEDING

CHAPTER 30 BIOINFORMATICS IN PLANT BREEDING

30.1 What is bioinformatics?

30.2 Subdivisions of bioinformatics

30.3 Workflow of a bioinformatics project

30.4 General goals of bioinformatics

30.5 Data for bioinformatics

30.6 Data sources and how they are used in bioinformatics

30.7 Types of bioinformatics databases

30.8 Data management in integration

30.9 Data mining

30.10 Applications of bioinformatics in plant breeding

30.11 What is big data?

30.12 Big data workflow in plant breeding

30.13 Plant breeding applications

30.14 What is a computer simulation of model

30.15 Applications of computer simulation in plant breeding

30.16 Ideotype breeding

30.17 Simulation models in plant breeding

SECTION 12  VARIETY RELEASE PROCESS IN BREEDING

CHAPTER 31 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FOR CULTIVAR RELEASE

31.1 Purpose of performance trials

31.2 Kinds of field trials

31.3 Designing field trials

31.4 The role of the environment in field trials

31.5 Genotype x environment interaction (GEI)

31.6 Models of GxE interaction

31.7 Measurement of GxE interaction using ANOVA

31.8 Importance and applications of GEI in plant breeding

31.9 Stability analysis models

31.10 Adaptation

31.11 Field plot technique in plant breeding

31.12 Field plot designs

31.13 Materials, equipment, and machinery for field evaluation of genotypes

CHAPTER 32 SEED CERTIFICATION AND COMMERCIAL SEED RELEASE

32.1 The role of improved seed in agriculture

32.2 The role of the private sector in seed breeding

32.3 General steps of operation of the seed industry

32.4 The cultivar release process

32.5 Multiplication of pedigree seed

32.6 Concept of seed certification

32.7 The seed certification process

32.8 Seed testing

32.9 Tagging commercial seed

32.10 International role in seed certification

32.11 Production of conventional seed

32.12 Production of hybrid seed

32.13 Crop registration

32.14 Variety protection

CHAPTER 33 REGULATORY AND LEGAL ISSUES IN PLANT BREEDING

33.1 The concept of intellectual property

33.2 Patents

33.3 Patents in plant breeding biotechnology; unique issues and challenges

33.4 Protecting plant varieties

33.5 The concept of substantial equivalence in regulation of biotechnology products

33.6 The issues of “novel traits”

33.7 The concept of the precautionary principle

33.8 Regulation and the issue of public trust

33.9 Biosafety regulation at the international level

33.10 Labelling of biotechnology products

33.11 Economic impact of labelling and regulations

33.12 Legal risks that accompany adoptions of GM crops

33.13 Overview of the regulation of the biotechnology industry in the United States

33.14 The impact of IPRs on plant breeding

SECTION 13 SOCIETAL ISSUES IN PLANT BREEDING

CHAPTER 34 VALUE-DRIVEN CONCEPTS AND SOCIAL CONCERNS

34.1 Concepts of ethical, moral and values

34.2 Evolution of societal debates on science-based issues

34.3 Ethics in plant breeding

34.4 Risk analysis of biotechnology

34.5 Genetic use restriction systems

34.6 Public perceptions and fears about biotechnology

34.7 Some concerns of plant breeders

34.8 GM foods and the issues of food allergy

34.9 The concepts of organic breeding

34.10 Principles of organic plant breeding

34.11 Acceptable organic plant breeding techniques

34.12 Making agricultural biotechnology more acceptable to society

34.13 The hallo effect of GM crops in the field

34.14 The rise of minor pests in GM fields

34.15 Who owns biodiversity?

CHAPTER 35 INTERNATIONAL PLANT BREEDING EFFORTS

35.1 International crop research centers

35.2 The CGIAR centers and their mission

35.3 Brief overview of plant breeding in developed countries

35.4 Brief overview of plant breeding in developing countries

35.5 Plant breeding efforts in sub-Saharan Africa

35.6 Biotechnology efforts in developing countries

35.7 New approach to international-national collaborative breeding

35.8 Conventional plant breeding versus decentralized-participatory plant breeding

35.9 The Green Revolution

35.10 The Green Revolution and the impact of international breeding efforts

SECTION 14 BREEDING SELECTED CROPS

CHAPTER 36 Breeding wheat

CHAPTER 37 Breeding corn

CHAPTER 38 Breeding rice

CHAPTER 39 Breeding sorghum

CHAPTER 40 Breeding of soybean

CHAPTER 41 Breeding peanut

CHAPTER 42 Breeding potato

CHAPTER 43 Breeding cotton

CHAPTER 44 Breeding tomato

SUPPLEMENTARY CHAPTERS: REVIEW OF GENETIC STATISTICAL PRINCIPLES

S1 Plant cellular organization and genetic structure: An overview

S2 Common statistical methods in plant breeding

Glossary of Terms

Index

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