Vendor
Borchardt Agency
Published by
Pantheon Books / Knopf (2017-02-21)
Original language
English
Themas
Politics & government
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AMERICAN SANCTUARY

Mutiny, Martyrdom, and National Identity in the Age of Revolution

by Ekirch, Roger A.

AMERICAN SANCTUARY is the extraordinary story of the mutiny aboard the frigate HMS Hermione in 1797 (eight years after the mutiny on the Bounty).

It was the bloodiest mutiny ever suffered by the Royal Navy, that led to the extradition from America, and the hanging by the British, of the martyred sailor Jonathan Robbins. This event plunged the two-decade-old American Republic into a constitutional crisis, and powerfully contributed to the outcome of the U.S. presidential election of 1800. It propelled to the fore the fundamental issue of political asylum and extradition, still being debated today—more than two hundred years later.

A. ROGER EKIRCH was born in Washington, D.C., and raised in Alexandria, Virginia, and Delmar, New York. He is the author of Bound for America, Birthright, and At Day’s Close. He holds degrees from Dartmouth College and John Hopkins University, and is a professor of history at Virginia Tech.

Available rights (1)

Language Territory Type Vendor Status
German World All

Mohrbooks Literary Agency
Sebastian Ritscher

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Comments

Fascinating. Ekirch is a marvelous storyteller. Beautifully written and engrossing, abook that should be of interest, to the historian, and to the general public. Animportant addition to our understanding of early American history.

Quote: James Roger Sharp, author of American Politics in the Early Republic

One of the most important—and enjoyable—books I have read in many years . . . An extraordinary journey. Ekirch's gripping narrative brings a largely forgotten episode to life, illuminating its immediate impact on party politics in a polarized, revolutionary age and on the new nation's enduring identity as an asylum of liberty. Ekirch's brilliant reconstruction is a triumph of historical research and analysis.

Quote: Peter S. Onuf, Professor of History at the University of Virginia

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